Training childcare professionals to reduce childhood sexual abuse – See more at: http://www.d2lblog.com/2016/01/04/training-childcare-professionals-to-reduce-childhood-sexual-abuse/#sthash.qHFavYeJ.fEqbSz3a.dpuf
Training childcare professionals to reduce childhood sexual abuse – See more at: http://www.d2lblog.com/2016/01/04/training-childcare-professionals-to-reduce-childhood-sexual-abuse/#sthash.qHFavYeJ.fEqbSz3a.dpuf
Training childcare professionals to reduce childhood sexual abuse – See more at: http://www.d2lblog.com/2016/01/04/training-childcare-professionals-to-reduce-childhood-sexual-abuse/#sthash.qHFavYeJ.cR082sIX.dpuf
Training childcare professionals to reduce childhood sexual abuse – See more at: http://www.d2lblog.com/2016/01/04/training-childcare-professionals-to-reduce-childhood-sexual-abuse/#sthash.qHFavYeJ.cR082sIX.dpuf

 

Richmond Family Magazine: Real-Life Child Abuse Prevention: Difficult Questions Answered: April 1, 2016  FAM Coordinator Denise Noble  responds to parental guidance questions.

Training childcare professionals to reduce childhood sexual abuse.  January 4, 2016
Teachers, daycare workers, and clergy are responsible for nearly two-thirds of the reports of sexual abuse to child protective services in the US. But programs that prepare these professionals to recognize and prevent abuse are rare. A brief training program called Stewards of Children aims to fill the gap.

Teachers, daycare workers, and clergy are responsible for nearly two-thirds of the reports of sexual abuse to child protective services in the US. But programs that prepare these professionals to recognize and prevent abuse are rare. A brief training program called Stewards of Children aims to fill the gap. – See more at: http://www.d2lblog.com/2016/01/04/training-childcare-professionals-to-reduce-childhood-sexual-abuse/#sthash.qHFavYeJ.fEqbSz3a.dpuf

Expert Parenting Advice: FAM’s (Families are Magic) Denise Noble responds to Parental Guidance questions in Richmond Family Magazine. December 31, 2015

FAM’s (Families are Magic) Denise Noble responds to Parental Guidance questions in Richmond Family Magazine. October 30, 2015

The Child Advocacy Center Has  New Home
Richmond BizSense, March 26, 2014

Richmond’s Child Advocacy Center, which helps abused children, is moving to 101 E. Grace St. It will be next door to Greater Richmond SCAN (Stop Child Abuse Now) which runs the CAC. CAC Coordinator Ian Danielsen said the organization has outgrown its current space in the old city hall on East Broad Street. When part of the building next door to SCAN became available for rent, they jumped at the chance.

“More and more jurisdictions are using us to coordinate their child-abuse investigations,” Danielsen said.

Childhood Trauma

SCAN has been working to train its staff, volunteers and board members about childhood trauma and the importance of being a trauma-focused organization. To view our Trauma 101 Training Powerpoint click here. To view our worksheet on Trauma and its Effects on Children click here.  For information about the National Childhood Trauma Stress Network, visit their website.

Adverse Childhood Experiences Study
Huffington Post, November 2012

It would reveal that adverse experiences in childhood were very common, even in the white middle-class, and that these experiences are linked to every major chronic illness and social problem that the United States grapples with – and spends billions of dollars on. 

America’s Report Card 2012 – Children in the U.S.
First Focus and Save the Children, October 2012

“A majority of American voters believe, for the first time in history, the lives of children have become worse over the last ten years.”  The report card goes on to grade five aspects of child well-being and how America’s children are faring in these areas: Economic Security; Early Childhood; K-12 Education; Permanency and Stability; and Health and Safety.

Prevent Child Abuse America Child Abuse and Neglect Costs Report

Child abuse and neglect affects over 1 million children every year. Child abuse and neglect costs our nation $220 million every day. For investigations. For foster care. For. medical and mental health treatment. And later for special education, juvenile and adult crime, chronic health problems and other costs across the life span. We will pay a staggering $80 billion to address child abuse and neglect in 2012. This accompanying report breaks costs down by states. In Virginia, we will pay an estimated $1,591,370,000.00 in 2012 in costs related to child abuse and neglect.  

“Community Prevention Plan for Child Abuse and Neglect”  

This plan intends to review the current research about child abuse and neglect prevention., highlight the strength of the FAM Network’s response to the needs of area parents, and to identify ways that organizations can work together to expand access too services and reach more families before child maltreatment occues.

“Cost of Child Abuse and Neglect Rival Other Major Health Problems
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, February 1, 2012

…The total lifetime estimated financial costs associated with just one year of confirmed cases of child maltreatment (physical abuse, sexual abuse, psychological abuse and neglect) is approximately $124 billion.

“Bringing Abuse to Light: Virginia Must Expand Its Reporting Laws”
Daily Press, December 2011

… stricter laws on the books won’t alone guarantee that crimes against children will be reported. According to advocacy organization Darkness to Light, 73 percent of child victims do not tell anyone about abuse for at least a year; 45 percent don’t tell for at least five years. To protect children more effectively, adults must do a better job looking for warning signs and reporting suspicions, regardless of legal requirements

“Silence Common in Child Sexual Abuse Cases”
USA Today, December 2011

As police investigate allegations of child molestation by coaches at Penn Stateand Syracuse, nagging questions linger about signs that may have been missed — or ignored.

“What We Can Learn from Penn State”
Darkness to Light, November 2011

Child safety is the job of an adult.  Teaching children how to keep themselves safe from abuse is important, but adults bear the burden of stepping up and speaking out when something doesn’t look or feel right with respect to the wellbeing of a child. 

“America’s Child Death Shame”
BBC News, October 2011

[s]ixty-six children under the age of 15 die from physical abuse or neglect every week in the industrialized world. 27 of those die in the US – the highest number of any other country.

“Poverty Clinic: Can a Stressful Childhood Make You a Sick Adult?”
New Yorker, March 2011

…the traumatic events that Sullivan experienced in childhood had likely caused significant and long-lasting chemical changes in both her brain and her body, and these changes could well be making her sick, and also increasing her chances of serious medical problems in adulthood. And Sullivan’s case wasn’t unusual.

 

 

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